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Operational Excellence through Leadership and Compliance

Maritime Compliance Report

Welcome. Staying in compliance takes dedication, diligence and strong leadership skills to stay on top of all the requirements which seem to keep coming at a rapid pace. With this blog I hope to provide visitors with content that will help them in their daily work of staying in compliance. I hope you find it a resource worthy of your time and I look forward to your feedback, questions, comments and concerns. Thanks for stopping by.

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RCP v. Subchapter M

The proposed rule containing regulations for the inspection of towing vessels, known as Subchapter M, is due to be published in a few months.  It is expected that these regulations will include a towing vessel safety management systems. Many towing vessel companies currently have a safety management system (SMS) in place known as the American Waterways Operators (AWO) Responsible Carrier Program (RCP).  Having been both a U.S. Coast Guard marine inspector and an AWO RCP auditor, I have noticed a different expectation regarding the level of implementation required between inspected vessel's SMS and RCP. I suspect that some RCP companies might have a difficult time with Subchapter M enforcement if they don't step up the level of implementation.

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New Safety Management System Workbook Available

A common practice throughout the maritime industry, despite elaborate safety management systems (SMS) which have been put in place, is to simply rely on the credentials and experience of mariners to operate safely. But the expectation with Safety Management Systems (SMS) is that written policies and procedures are to be followed by employees, both ashore and afloat.   Just ask anyone who has been involved in a serious accident investigation, or litigation. 

The hard truth is, best way to learn the company’s policies and procedures is to “hit the books” and actually look up the information and apply it to real-life situations.  The best way to ensure this is done is to provide a tool to shipboard and shore-side employees which will help them do the work.

 

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What's the best way to get captains and crews to learn company policies and procedures?

These days there are many policies and procedures for crews to follow. As we have discussed in the past, many policies and procedures may be unreasonable or unrealistic, but once they have been customized and refined, what's the best way to get captains and crews to learn and follow them? Unfortunately, the answer is to "crack the books" which not too many people enjoy.  This is a true leadership challenge, but with the right skills and tools it can be done.

Please join us in New Orleans on April 29th for an important seminar on the proper implemenation of safety management systems.  Please follow the link below for further details:
http://www.marcomint.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=24&Itemid=16

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USCG to “Evaluate Compliance” of EPA VGP March 11, 2011

Beginning March 11, 2011 during vessel boardings and inspections, the U.S. Coast Guard will begin evaluating compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Vessel General Permit (VGP).  A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was recently signed between the two agencies, and a USCG policy letter was published, requiring Coast Guard inspectors to use a job aid to evaluate the level of compliance on a particular vessel, document any discrepancies, and pass them along to the EPA.  The EPA retains enforcement authority and will take enforcement action based upon the information gathered by the USCG.

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Important SMS information for 2011

Please watch this brief, but important video message...

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EPA VGP Compliance – Do You Have All the Facts?

Each vessel owner/operator I ask about EPA VGP compliance gives me a different response:  “Oh yeah, I heard about that…We’ve got it covered we just log how much graywater we discharge and try not to wash any oil over the side…I asked the Coast Guard and they don’t know anything about it…Is that for real..?” 

This year I was selected to do a session on EPA VGP compliance at the International WorkBoat Show Professional Series being held in New Orleans from December 1-3.  In preparation for my presentation, I just concluded a meeting in Houston with EPA officials who are responsible for the EPA VGP in EPA Region 6.

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Anti-Piracy Procedures and the Ship Security Plan

Recently, a group of U.S. Marines were able to board and regain control of a German-owned ship, which had been taken over by pirates off the coast of Somalia. They were able to do so without firing a single shot. According to a CNN report, a military spokesman claimed the members of the ship’s crew had locked themselves in a safe room, so the military felt it was a good time to board the ship.    

Many flag states and recognized security organizations world-wide require anti-piracy procedures to be contained in ship security plans required under the International Ship and Port Security (ISPS) code. While this recent intervention was a great success, it complicates things for those responsible for coming up with anti-piracy procedures and ensuring their implementation through drills and training.  Is this the new “best practice?”

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Regulators – Industry rejects or wannabes?

“Regulators are either industry rejects, or wannabes, neither of which makes for good regulators.” At least that is the opinion of one law professor at a recent lecture series I attended regarding the BP/ Deepwater Horizon oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. The comment was made during a discussion about what the responsibility and liability of federal regulators should be, such as those regulators from the agency formerly known as MMS (Mineral Management Service), who may not have performed their duties to the fullest of their abilities. I found the comment both offensive and intriguing at the same time. Offensive perhaps, because I have served as a federal marine inspector in the past; intriguing, because on some level, it rings true.

 

The implication is that a wannabe is more likely to look the other way in hopes of gaining favor with industry and ultimately securing a comfortable position. When I started out as a U.S. Coast Guard marine inspector years ago, an old-timer and co-worker told me, as I was writing a long list of deficiencies for a vessel, “You’re never going to get a job in this industry when you retire.”

 

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Brad Pitt on the Death Penalty for Oil Spillers

Years ago my psychology professor told us that in order for punishment to be effective, it must be swift, severe and consistent. The example he used was that if you want a child to stop playing with matches you should immediately hold his hand over a lit stove every time you catch him doing it. Of course, that was an extreme example used to make an important point. But based upon recently published reports, it seems that Hollywood actor Brad Pitt may be of the same mind. According to Mail Online, UK, Brad Pitt has weighed in on the Gulf oil spill controversy and said he would consider the death penalty for those to blame for the disaster which killed 11 men and spilled millions of gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. When asked about the people responsible for the crisis, Pitt reportedly said: “I was never for the death penalty before - I am willing to look at it again.” While Mr. Pitt’s comments may seem over the top, and based upon emotion, they raise an important point about compliance.

 

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Optimizing your Facility Security Plan (FSP)

Port security funds are supposed to be allocated to projects that will have the greatest impact. So, why would scarce taxpayer dollars be spent on fences and cameras to protect non-threatening areas such as settling ponds far away from the nearest waterway? The answer, most likely, is human error. The International Ship and Port Security (ISPS) Code requires port facilities around the globe to comply with the maritime security requirements of the Code. For U.S. port facilities, the U.S. Coast Guard regulations derived from Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA) of 2002 provided a definition of the term “facility.” However, many years later, there are still conflicting opinions regarding what portions of a facility must be included under the maritime security regulations. The definition of a facility, beyond the description of the waterfront portion, calls for “any contiguous or adjoining property” to be included. Despite this definition, some facilities simply fenced off their docks, called that their facility, and got away with it. Other similar facilities were required to spend tens of thousands of dollars on fencing and other access control issues for their entire property.
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